The Yukon Mint™ gold coins will be part of a limited annual series of First Nation art on the Obverse side of the coin, selected through design contests, combined with the iconic image of Klondike Gold Rush on the Reverse.

The Yukon Mint™ gold coins are unique in that they are Yukon in almost every aspect, from raw material to design.

Special Features

  • NEW 2020 GOLD AND SILVER COIN SERIES available now, collectors of all kinds will cherish this coin on its sheer merits as a work of art that opens a privileged window on the rich cultural heritage of the Yukon
  • First Silver coin released proudly bearing the logo of the Artic Winter Games
  • .9999 Gold Your coin is a masterpiece crafted in 99.99% pure gold
  • PRESTIGIOUS AND EXCLUSIVE gold coin series with limited mintage of 1 ounce coins 1/10 ounce coins worldwide
  • INCLUDES SERIALIZED CERTIFICATE The Yukon Mint certifies all of its collector coins
  • SECURITY FEATURE Each coin crafted from 99.99% pure gold has a security feature to verify authenticity
  • GST/HST EXEMPT Your coin is GST/HST exempt

2020 Yukon Gold Coin – NOW AVAILABLE

The 2020 Yukon Gold Coin features the work of artist Brian Walker and his son Justin Smith’s cauldron, original metalwork art piece commissioned by the 2020 Artic Winter Games Host Society to serve as the flame and the centerpiece of the opening ceremony and Arctic Winter Games. Available in 1 ounce and 1/10 ounce coins

The Arctic Winter Games is an international biennial celebration of sports and culture for the circumpolar north. Founded in 1969 under the leadership of Governor Walter J. Hickel of AlaskaStuart M. HodgsonCommissioner of the Northwest Territories, and Yukon Commissioner James Smith the Games provide a forum where athletes from the circumpolar North meet and compete and where cultural delegations share their talent in the North. Participants come together from Alaska, Greenland, Yukon Nunavut, Nunavik, Northern Alberta, Northwest Territories, Sami people (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Russia) and Yamal, Russia. The Arctic Winter Games promote an atmosphere of social interaction that strengthens cultural awareness and understanding, increases community pride, enhances self-esteem and promotes volunteerism.

2020 YUKON GOLD COIN

Obverse

2020 YUKON GOLD COIN

 

Reverse

2020 YUKON GOLD COIN - Inverse

2020 Yukon Gold Coin – Obverse

‘The Wealth That is Our Children’ is an original metalwork art piece commissioned by the 2020 Artic Winter Games Host Society to serve as the flame and the centerpiece of the opening ceremony and Arctic Winter Games. The design features four tináa, the Tlingit word for copper shield, and a representation of wealth, to protect the flame. The inspiration for the tináa came from children, the wealth is not about money or power, it is the wealth of our children and their development. The cauldron is multi-dimension allowing you to see the inside and is a whole representation of the human child because it has an outer and an inner light. The four directions of the shield represent all the directions of the territories represented at the Arctic Winter Games.

2020 Yukon Gold Coin – Reverse

All Yukon Mint coins feature the iconic image linked to the Yukon that speaks to the history and entrepreneurial spirit of exploration. The Klondike Gold Rush (1897-1899) was an epic journey, to an uncharted land in search of adventure and opportunity in the continent’s final frontier. It seared the word “Klondike” into the collective consciousness of a generation. That is the way it was then, and people still seek to follow the steps of the Klondike stampeders to this very day.

2020 Yukon and Artic Winter games silver coin – PRE ORDER NOW

The 2020 Yukon Silver Coin features the work of artist Brian Walker and his son Justin Smith’s cauldron, original metalwork art piece commissioned by the 2020 Artic Winter Games Host Society to serve as the flame and the centerpiece of the opening ceremony and Arctic Winter Games. The reverse Available in 1 ounce.

Obverse

2020 YUKON SILVER COIN - Obverse

Reverse

2020 YUKON SILVER COIN - Inverse

2020 Yukon Silver Coin – Obverse

‘The Wealth That is Our Children’ is an original metalwork art piece commissioned by the 2020 Artic Winter Games Host Society to serve as the flame and the centerpiece of the opening ceremony and Arctic Winter Games. The design features four tináa, the Tlingit word for copper shield, and a representation of wealth, to protect the flame. The inspiration for the tináa came from children, the wealth is not about money or power, it is the wealth of our children and their development. The cauldron is multi-dimension allowing you to see the inside and is a whole representation of the human child because it has an outer and an inner light. The four directions of the shield represent all the directions of the territories represented at the Arctic Winter Games.

2020 Yukon Silver Coin – Reverse

The Arctic Winter Games is an international biennial celebration of sports and culture for the circumpolar north. Founded in 1969 under the leadership of Governor Walter J. Hickel of AlaskaStuart M. HodgsonCommissioner of the Northwest Territories, and Yukon Commissioner James Smith the Games provide a forum where athletes from the circumpolar North meet and compete and where cultural delegations share their talent in the North. Participants come together from Alaska, Greenland, Yukon Nunavut, Nunavik, Northern Alberta, Northwest Territories, Sami people (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Russia) and Yamal, Russia. The Arctic Winter Games promote an atmosphere of social interaction that strengthens cultural awareness and understanding, increases community pride, enhances self-esteem and promotes volunteerism.

Brian Walker – Artist Biography

Brian's artistic interest sparked in 1958 when he visited Bill Reid, the acclaimed Haida artist, when he began his first large commission for the University of British Columbia, Over the course of two years and one full summer he was given basic instruction in carving and learning the traditions and meaning behind historic and contemporary work. Since that time, but more so beginning in 1989 he continued taking instruction from well known artists including Dempsey Bob, Keith Wolfe Smarch and Philip Janze.

In 1992 he participated in the opening exhibit at the Yukon Arts Centre with "Copper Stories" which was a bronze and cedar piece. The piece is now in the front lobby of the YAC. He also created a large carved canoe bowl, now on display in Bella Bella, British Columbia. At that time, he became interested in copper as an artistic material because of its ancient connection with Yukon history.

In 1998 he was commissioned to create "Where Legends meet" which was a large 8'x13' bronze, copper and steel sculpture which is now displayed at the Beringia Centre. This piece was in collaboration with Mark Porter and it brought together two First Nation mythical themes.

Brian continues to create regalia pieces for First Nations ceremonial and performance uses. In 2010 the Yukon Permanent Art Collection acquired my copper bowl, "Directions". In 2013 and 2014 he conducted a series of intensive workshops in copper work for the Northern Cultural Expressions Society's carving students.

In 2014 he participated in the "Journey's" project at the Adaka Cultural Festival and the ongoing exhibitions at Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre.

In May 2016 his work was shown at the Inuit Art Gallery in Vancouver in an exhibition titled "Brian Walker: Copper Stories". From this exhibition, a number of pieces were acquired by collections through Canada and USA. Most noteworthy, was the purchase by the Government of Canada of "Children of the Sun" for the Canadian Embassy in Brussels, Belgium.

Throughout the summer of 2019 Brian and his wife Ann Smith presented a well received exhibition of weavings and copper work entitled "Echo of the Spirit Voice" at the Yukon Arts Centre Gallery. Between July and August 2019 he was invited to participate in "Continuum", a 40-year retrospective and current work of many respected Indigenous artists who have shown work at the Inuit Gallery.

In the fall of 2019 and into 2020 he worked with his son Justin Smith on the cauldron for the Arctic Winter Games. Brian continues to exhibit at the Inuit Gallery and his work can be seen at http://www.inuit.com

For more information on Brian Walker please view:  https://journeystoadaka.com/index.php/stories/detail/copper-artist-brian-walker?fbclid=IwAR3w7ADXyT6GCFLH5RbUp-VxtqfHwYmjpfs7GNeUFvdYRnZPVQl15LLx2Eg

Justin Smith – Artist Biography

Justin was inspired by his parents Brian Walker and Ann Smith; both of whom are greatly recognized within the Yukon community. Justin embraced First Nation Art, which eventually led him to study at the Institute of American Indian Art in New Mexico.

In 2004 Justin joined Northern Culture Expressions Society's carving program giving him the opportunity to work in a team based environment where he continued to learn and advance his skills. It allowed him to update his portfolio that consists of staffs, panels, masks, walking staffs, bentwood boxes, original designs, drawing and much more.

Justin's notable accomplishments include: the completion of Healing Totem Pole guided by Carver Wayne Price, Chief Shakes Clan House in Wrangell Alaska and the Dugout Canoe Project that was gifted to the Kwanlin Dun First Nation. As a citizen of Kwanlin Dun First Nation, Justin Smith is proud to continue his family tradition as an accomplished First Nation artist.

"I want to reconnect with nature and find a way to live in harmony, to help others and myself." - Justin Smith